Spiders



Spider control and extermination can be a major concern for homeowners - particularly for those who live in the southwest. There are about 3,000 species of spiders throughout North America, but the good news is that only two in the southern and western United States can cause serious harm when accidentally disturbed - the black widow spider and brown recluse spider. This is why it’s particularly important to only hire well-trained spider exterminators to eliminate an infestation.

There are thousands of different types, sizes and colors of spiders found all over the world in nearly every type of habitat. Spiders rarely bite humans unless their nests or webs are disturbed. With the exception of a few species, the venom in spider bites is harmless to humans, but some individuals may be hypersensitive and can have a mild to severe allergic reaction when bitten. Spiders feed primarily on other insects, but larger species have been known to feed on small animals such as lizards, birds and millipedes. Spiders in your home can be a sign of a larger pest infestation, and their building of webs indoors can prove to be a nuisance for most homeowners when left untreated. The combination of good sanitation practices and a comprehensive pest control treatment program are necessary to eliminating spiders inside the home.

How Do They Get in the Home?

Loose screens and cracks under doors, windows, and other openings are all possible entryways for a spider. These pests may move indoors while searching for food, mates, warmth, or moisture. The presence of insects and other prey in homes is a common reason for spiders to come inside. Spiders are also accidentally introduced inside homes when they are unknowingly introduced to the home’s interior via infested items such as plants, firewood, clothing and other items stored in attics, basements or other storage areas.

How Serious Are Spiders?

While most spiders pose little or no danger to people, some species can deliver venomous bites that may cause medical issues. In the U.S., the two most common venomous spiders are the brown recluse, distinguished by the violin-shaped marking on the top of its cephalothorax, the body part consisting the spider’s fused together head and thorax. The other important venomous spider is the black widow, notable for the red hourglass shape on the underside of its jet-black abdomen.

Spider Behavior & Habits

Some spiders like moisture and are found in basements, crawl spaces and other damp parts of buildings. Others like dry, warm areas such as subfloor air vents, upper corners of rooms and attics. They hide in dark areas.

Tens of thousands of spider species have been identified throughout the world. These arachnids have eight legs and two body segments. Spiders have three or four pair of eyes. Many spiders have poor vision, but some species of spiders, such as the jumping spider, have exceptional vision.

Although spiders are often feared or considered a nuisance, spiders play a unique role in the biological control of other insects. Spiders found inside the home are often a sign of a larger pest infestation and proper treatment and sanitation methods should be used to ensure control.

If you are looking for quality pest control solutions for your home or business, reach out to Ready Pest Control today!



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